Orthopaedic & Cruciate Surgeries

Perth’s Go-To Cruciate Surgeon for Dogs

Making the world a happier place, one leg at a time.

Dog Cruciate Surgery In Perth

 

First of all, what’s a cruciate ligament?

You’ve got two of them in each of your knees and so does your dog. The cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) is the most common of the two to experience problems. When the Cruciate Ligament in a human ruptures, it is typically the result of an athletic injury. This can also be true for dogs - jumping for a ball and what have you - but more common for dogs is the gradual degeneration of the ligament leading to an eventual rupture. Not only can this be more challenging for us to diagnose, but, as you can imagine, it’s also quite painful and not a lot of fun for your dog!

Cruciate ligament injuries in dogs are the most common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs and the bigger the pup, the bigger the issue. For us humans, surgery isn’t the only option; rest and physical rehabilitation might be recommended depending on the circumstances. For dogs, however, recoveries without surgery are rare and delaying surgery often leads to an increased risk of cartilage damage.

If your dog appears to struggle when applying weight to one of its hind legs, then they might be experiencing ligament degeneration or rupture. If so, don’t delay! Contact us immediately using the form below to book an urgent consultation.

Furry Family Members We’ve Healed

Bruce’s Cruciate Surgery Journey

Like Bruce, there are many dogs who experience a torn cruciate ligament. This causes significant instability in the affected rear leg to the point that no pressure can be placed on it. Like Bruce, many dogs have come to Hilton Vet Hospital and have regained athletic ability after treatment and rehabilitation. Here are a few clips to show Bruce’s progress. Within just one week Bruce was up and about with just a small limp.

Keisha’s Cruciate Surgery 

Keisha is a lovely 9-year-old Golden Retriever who needed Cruciate Surgery. After examination, the MMP Cruciate Surgery was the best choice and as you can see the recovery was fantastic! Hilton Vet Hospital sees great results for Cruciate Ligament Surgeries in Perth.

Your pet’s health and wellbeing is our #1 concern.

Our second-opinion consultations are completely free so you don’t have to worry about breaking the bank while you’re worrying about your furry friend. 

 

Slow degeneration of the CCL can happen after a series of minor injuries to the ligament. This often leads to a partial tear that is more challenging to diagnose.

At Hilton Vet Hospital, we offer two surgical repair techniques to restore stability in the knee:

[

LFS

Lateral Fabella Suture technique
[

MMP

Modified Maquet Procedure (modern version of TTA)
The first technique (LFS) is used in small and medium animals and the second (MMP) in large dogs, roughly 20kgs and over.

You want your dog back in great shape. Guess what? So do we."

How We Mend Man’s Best Friend

We understand that when your pet is in pain, you’re hurting too. At Hilton Vet Hospital, we determine which of two procedures is going to be most beneficial for your dog so that we can get them back to their original self. Below we offer some detail on both procedures as well as videos and a PDF that are packed with extra information!

Your pets are our passion and we don’t want to see them suffering any more than you do, but we can’t help if we don’t know you need it! Starting the healing process is as simple as signing up for an online newsletter - except we only use your information to get in touch.

Surgical Procedures

Orthopaedic surgery corrects problems involving the bones, joints and ligaments of the body. This will be necessary in the case of accidents causing fractures, injuries causing rupture of ligaments or developmental problems like patella luxations or hip dysplasia.

Radiographs are taken to determine the severity of the problem and to determine the best surgical approach. At Hilton Vet Hospital we make use of a digital X-ray processor to give us excellent quality radiographs. Two views are taken while the patient is under anaesthesia to make sure no movement will blur the image.

Fractures

Trauma to any of the bones in the body can potentially cause a fracture. This is treated as an emergency and needs immediate pain relief. The body might also go into a state of shock and the patient needs to be stabilised with the use of intravenous fluid drip. The fracture is stabilised with the use of a splint till the time that radiographs can be taken and surgery performed. Surgery might be postponed for a day or two till the patient is stable and strong enough to handle the anaesthesia and surgery. Most of the time metal implants like pins, wire or plate and screws are used to fix the fracture.

Ligaments

Trauma to any of the bones in the body can potentially cause a fracture. This is treated as an emergency and needs immediate pain relief. The body might also go into a state of shock and the patient needs to be stabilised with the use of intravenous fluid drip. The fracture is stabilised with the use of a splint till the time that radiographs can be taken and surgery performed. Surgery might be postponed for a day or two till the patient is stable and strong enough to handle the anaesthesia and surgery. Most of the time metal implants like pins, wire or plate and screws are used to fix the fracture.

Patella Luxation

This happens when the kneecap (patella) is dislocated from its normal position in the groove of the femur. It is usually a genetic problem that the patient was born with. It is most common in small dog breeds. It can vary from a low to high grade luxation. This problem can be very successfully corrected with surgery.

Hip luxation

Dislocation of the hip joint is usually associated with trauma to the hip. In car accidents, the femoral head ligament and hip joint capsule are usually torn causing the femur head to dislocate. In mild acute cases, the dislocation can be corrected without surgery if it is attended to straight away. In severe cases, orthopaedic surgery is needed to repair the damage.

Hip Dysplasia

HD is another genetic problem that can leads to arthritis in the hips joints. The acetabulum or hip joint socket in these patients is underdeveloped and very shallow. This causes the hip joint to be unstable, leading to early wear and tear. The symptoms are hip pain, difficulty walking and reluctance to jump. Conservative treatment like anti-inflammatories and joint modification drugs are used in early and mild cases. Surgery is often needed when conservative treatment is unsuccessful. Femur head amputation or total hip replacement are the surgical techniques of choice.